Thursday, 29 March 2012

Appropriate dress for Glasgow

After our event in Glasgow today, the speakers, hosts and sponsors were invited to a excellent Indian meal at Mr Singh's Taste of India (just off Sauchiehall Street). On the way, our party managed to break into two groups. While waiting for the others, we stood shivering on the corner; it had been a warm day, but by the time the sun had gone down, with a west wind rising,

I felt distinctly under-dressed in shirt and suit. But the locals' approach to dress is simple: if the sun shines (and it very rarely does in Glasgow), it must be the height of summer. So the fashion must suit the season. Below: A group of Glaswegians sets off for a night on the toon.

Temperature a mere +8C, with wind chill factor, it feels like +5C (the English language still lacks a word for temperatura odczuwalna). It would not get any warmer on their journey home from pub, club or restaurant!

3 comments:

sportif said...

"Temperature a mere +8C, with wind chill factor, it feels like +5C (the English language still lacks a word for temperatura odczuwalna)."

w Warszawie, w radio "WaWa" nazywają to "czynnik chłodzenia wiatrem" :)

Jerzy Stachowiak said...

(the English language still lacks a word for temperatura odczuwalna

Not true. It's called "wind chill".

Michael Dembinski said...

@ Jerzy Stachowiak:

Let's imagine a day where the temperature is +0C, there's no wind at all, but relative humidity is 90%. Now imagine a day where the temperature is also +0C, there's also no wind, but relative humidity is only 45%. Which day feels colder? The term 'temperatura odczuwalna' takes air humidity into account, 'wind chill does not'. The term 'wind chill' only looks at one factor; 'temperatura odczuwalna' takes in many. Here endeth the first lesson :)